Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble
Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble Sibelius - Ouverture in F - Academic Brass Ensemble
$50.00

Ouverture in F - by Jean Sibelius, arranged for Academic Brass Ensemble by Mogens Andresen.

 

In his youth, the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius spent his summer holidays in the small idyllic town of Loviisa. Before leaving for Berlin on his first foreign study trip, Sibelius wrote some charming pieces for the Loviisa brass septet, the band of the Louiisa fire brigade conducted by a friend of Sibelius the horn player Christian Haupt.
It was so early in his career that these pieces didn't get an opus number yet.
One of these pieces is the OUVERTURE in F written 1889-90 and here re-instrumented for the standard combination of instruments in the ACADEMIC BRASS SERIES.

Jean Sibelius (1865-1957), painting by Eero Järnfelt 1892

This product is available for digital download only - the item includes :

  • Score (69 pages)
  • Piccolo Trumpet part in Bb
  • Trumpet part in Eb
  • Trumpet part in Bb
  • Cornet part in Bb
  • Flugelhorn part
  • 2 French Horn parts
  • Alto Trombone part
  • Tenor Trombone part
  • Bass Trombone part
  • Euphonium part
  • Tuba part
  • 2 Percussion parts

Finnish Brass Septet

The traditional Finnish brass septet consists of: Eb-cornet, 2 Bb-cornets, tenor (alto) horn in Eb, 2 baritones/euphoniums in Bb and tuba. The Torviseitsikko is a central factor in Finnish band history, having been the most common type of ensemble in villages, societies, fire brigades, etc. from the 1870s and up to the 1920s. The scores were normally for seven parts, sometimes expanding with percussion, but in performance there usually were some doublings in the brass parts.